Poem barbie doll by marge piercy

Why did marge piercy write barbie doll

She tries to be accepted by society but they deny her because of her looks. The danger of falling. It is here that she gets her first real life taste of the contradictions inherent in being a woman in modern society. In fact, Piercy was an active organizer who had a hand in all sorts of political cookie jars, including, but not limited to, feminism and the SDS Students for a Democratic Society. The world has ground her down to their standards. First stanza[ edit ] The first stanza begins with a girl being born; fitting perfectly into a mold provided by the society she was born into. So she went from being a healthy, capable young girl to a confused, depressed adolescent, and then she commits suicides. But for our purposes, we just can't get over the way Piercy's speaker in "Barbie Doll" really pulls together the absurd ways that young girls are brainwashed into looking and being something they're not. The confusing messages that young girls too often take from the culture can lead them astray, and instead of finding their inner beauty and strength they succumb to a superficial standard that leads only to perdition. So we've got it all here, folks: real life situations we can all identify with, some darkly humorous imagery that reveals the follies of the adult world including "pee-pee" dolls , and a chance to give those ridiculous expectations a kick to the curb—right where they belong. She ultimately died trying to be as perfect as her Barbie Doll, a cookie cutter woman molded by society. The Barbie Doll has been a cultural icon since it was created in , a little over 10 years before this poem was published. So she cut off her nose and her legs and offered them up.

Each of these authors uses women and how these women deal with their situation. She was healthy, tested intelligent, possessed strong arms and back, abundant sexual drive and manual dexterity.

Barbie doll marge piercy theme

The speaker explicitly states, in what is a shocking and brutal way, that the children she met in school told the child that she has, A great big nose and fat legs. Off Our Backs. This representation led to women looking up to something that did not actually exist in reality, and as the story goes in the poem, the girl ended up dying trying to be what her Barbie represented. This short lists of attributes are all things that are completely natural for a woman to have, but are often, and sometimes usually, frowned upon. It's a people thing since, last we checked, women play a mighty large part in the continuation of our society at large. The world has ground her down to their standards. She currently lives and works in Cape Cod, Massachusetts alongside her husband. The perfect female is thought to have flawless skin, perfect make up, and a slim body. Piercy and Robinson also utilize diction and literary elements in different ways to convey a similar feeling for the reader. And we've all been through puberty, so we know how tough it can be when kids our own age poke fun at us because of the superficial expectations that the adult world has invariably imposed upon us all. Kate Chopin uses nature and Mrs. This syntax helps the reader see all of the good aspects of the girl all at once, which then makes the reader question why the girl does not see them. Sadly, in one way, this is the case. Eventually, the "girlchild" in Piercy's poem is "worn out like a fan belt" because of all of the pressure and humiliation. She went to and fro apologizing.

She was inclined with the Students for a Democratic Society and many groups affiliated with feminism, environmental policy and anti-Vietnam War protests. Throughout the rest of the poem, she grows up striving to meet unattainable societal standards that her Barbie doll had represented.

Barbie doll poem thesis

In the poem, Piercy is writing about a young girl transitioning from a child to a women and how society and its idea of beauty affects her. Third Versagraph: Confusing Messages She was advised to play coy, exhorted to come on hearty, exercise, diet, smile and wheedle. This is the point in the poem at which her insecurities have been grounded. Sound a bit grim? Of course, the legs are no problem there, since a casket viewing entails only the upper torso, but the nose has been reconstructed by the mortician, and he has applied make-up and dressed her in "a pink and white nightie. She finally gave society her nose and legs because she could not live in this way anymore. Throughout her life Piercy has published approximately 20 novels, and 20 books of poetry. This journal gives an analysis on Marge Pierce's poem that can help the reader better understand her criticism. Being viewed as pretty by society was her goal, and she accomplished it.

Doesn't she look pretty? She was also encouraged to watch what she ate and to get exercise to reduce the size of her fat legs, no doubt.

Poem barbie doll by marge piercy

So we've got it all here, folks: real life situations we can all identify with, some darkly humorous imagery that reveals the follies of the adult world including "pee-pee" dollsand a chance to give those ridiculous expectations a kick to the curb—right where they belong.

Her good nature wore out like a fan belt. The Barbie Doll has been a cultural icon since it was created ina little over 10 years before this poem was published.

marge piercy poems

In fact, by end of the poem, the "girlchild" of the poem cuts off her "fat nose on thick legs" just to make everyone else happy and have a moment of looking pretty even though she's lying dead in a casket at this point.

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Marge Piercy’s Barbie Doll Essay